New recipes

The Ultimate Creamy Peanut Butter Taste Test Slideshow

The Ultimate Creamy Peanut Butter Taste Test Slideshow


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

We put seven of the top-selling peanut butters to the test. Which one came out on top?

Skippy/Itemmaster

The Ultimate Creamy Peanut Butter Taste Test

Photo Modified: Itemmaster

Ask a dozen Americans to name some foods that they can’t live without, and we bet that at least a few will mention peanut butter. It goes without saying that the smooth and creamy (or chunky, if that’s your thing) spread was one of the best things to ever encounter a slice of bread, but it has so many other culinary applications — from pie to Thai food — that it’s nothing short of a culinary miracle. And it’s also great right out of the jar. But which of the top-selling brands of peanut putter actually tastes the best? We put seven to the test, and the winner might surprise you.

#7 Justin's

Justin’s/Itemmaster

While we’re big fans of Justin’s peanut butter cups, the brand’s Classic Peanut Butter just wasn’t our thing. It was so thin and runny that it could be poured out of the jar, and even though our panel appreciated the fact that it tasted natural (the only ingredients are roasted peanuts and palm oil) it was also bland and desperately in need of a little saltiness and sweetness. We also weren’t big fans of the grainy texture.

#6 Peter Pan

Peter Pan/Itemmaster

All the way on the other end of the spectrum, Peter Pan’s offering was much too thick and was decidedly lacking in real roasted peanut flavor.

#5 Skippy

Skippy/Itemmaster

We found Skippy’s peanut butter to be nothing special, but did appreciate its texture and spreadability. Several panelists found it to be a touch too salty, however; with 150 milligrams per serving, it contains more salt than any other brand we tried.

#4 Trader Joe's

Trader Joe’s offering fell right in the middle of the pack, with most tasters agreeing that it had a pleasing texture and a classic, well-balanced flavor.

Jif/Itemmaster

Our panel found Jif to be everything they look for in a classic peanut butter: smooth, creamy, not too thin or too thick, and well-balanced in both saltiness and sweetness. The molasses also added a nice depth of flavor.

#2 Smart Balance

Smart Balance/itemmaster

Smart Balance was the taste test’s real dark horse. It tastes strongly of roasted peanuts and had a unique consistency that was slightly looser than the others (besides Justin’s), but in a good way. It also derives some of its sweetness from molasses. A couple other plusses: It contains no hydrogenated oils, and flaxseed oil adds omega-3s. We’d buy this one again in a heartbeat.

#1 Peanut Butter & Company

Peanut Butter & Co/Itemmaster

The near-universal favorite was Smooth Operator from Peanut Butter & Co. It had a smooth and silky consistency, a natural peanutty flavor, and a good balance of sweetness and salt — and it tasted great right out of the jar. And with its only ingredients being peanuts, dried cane syrup, palm oil, and salt, it contains no trans fats and lets the natural flavor of roasted peanuts really come through.


9 Ways to Cook With Powdered Peanut Butter

I'm a huge peanut butter fan—like an eat-a-jar-with-a-spoon-for-dinner type of fan. So, a few months ago, when I noticed powdered peanut butter on my local health food store shelf, I got curious. I heard people were stirring it into smoothies, mixing it into cookie dough, but I didn't really understand it. Dry peanut butter, what gives?

Being the peanut butter addict that I am, I needed to try it out. So I got a few jars and started experimenting with it in the Epi Test Kitchen, where I discovered that the powder format makes it super easy to add to a variety of different dishes. Here are 9 of the many things you can do with powdered peanut butter:

This one might be obvious, but it's worth mentioning. Mix 4 Tbsp. powdered peanut butter with 1 Tbsp. water and you'll get 2 Tbsp. "peanut butter," or at least a creamy, pseudo-peanut butter. A huge reason people love the stuff is the low-calorie appeal of powdered peanut butter—it's made by removing the natural oils from peanuts and making a powder from what remains—and in those 2 tablespoons of "peanut butter" there are just 90 calories calories and 3 grams of fat, compared to 190 calories and 16 grams of fat in 2 tablespoons of typical, natural creamy peanut butter.

Flavor-wise, not going to lie, the reconstituted version of the powdered stuff wasn't my favorite as straight "peanut butter" it has a sort-of-strange, metallically aftertaste. The true value of the product lies in its ability to meld with other ingredients.

As much as I love PB, I don't normally put peanut butter in my smoothie, because I find the flavor a little overpowering in drink form. But I know fans of the powdered stuff were using it in their smoothies because the powder packs a seriously healthy punch, plus it's smoother than the sometimes gritty real peanut butter. And when I stumbled on this grape and peanut butter smoothie recipe from Food Director Rhoda Boone, I knew it would be a good one. Instead of using the 1 Tbsp. peanut butter, I added in 2 Tbsp. powder, and the drink turned out delicious: slightly sweet, fresh, and full of peanut butter flavor. Like a PB&J, but better.

Peanut Butter and Grape Smoothie

Another easy way to add a spoonful of healthy protein to your breakfast bowl is by stirring it into oatmeal. Top it with fresh blueberries for a similar flavor to that PB&J, and add in plenty of nuts and toasted seeds for good texture.

Baked Oatmeal

You can also sprinkle the powdered stuff into your granola mix for a different take on breakfast. Add it to chocolate granola and you'll have a "puppy chow" flavor going on add it to a coconut, seeded mix for a more tropical version. Serve with Greek yogurt for even more protein.

Paleo Granola with Coconut and Almonds

That chocolate-peanut butter granola? I would totally bring that along on a road trip as a snack. What other snacks can you sprinkle powdered peanut butter on? Try it mixed into trail mix, toasted nuts, or even on caramel popcorn. Movie night just got way better.

Sticky and Sweet Popcorn

Add a boost of flavor and nutrition to your chicken cutlets by mixing a spoonful of powdered peanut butter into the dry mix along with some spicy red chile flakes and garlic powder. A good rule of thumb is to use 1/3 the amount of peanut butter powder as flour in the mixture.

Chicken Cutlets with Romesco and Serrano Cracklin's

Any sauce that calls for peanut butter—think Pad Thai, Asian slaws, or spicy peanut dipping sauces—can also be made with peanut butter powder just rehydrate it first so the sauce isn't too dry. You can also add a spoonful of the powder to a stir-fry to give it a boost of that signature Thai flavor.

Sweet and Spicy Peanut Noodles

For a nutty flavor boost, add peanut butter powder to any baked good—cakes, cookies, pancakes, breads. Since you're not adjusting the amount of fat or moisture in the dish—as you would be if you were swapping out the oil or butter for full-fat peanut butter—it's very easy to add to a recipe. Just sub in peanut butter powder for 1/3 the amount of flour called for in the recipe. For recipes that call for peanut butter already, simply rehydrate the powdered peanut butter and use the same amount.

Peanut Butter Sandwich Cookies, aka "The Nora Ephron"

Peanut butter powder can be used to upgrade desserts in so many ways. Want to frost your chocolate cake with peanut butter icing? Stir peanut butter powder into a simple buttercream frosting recipe. Or try it in chocolate mousse, rice pudding, or even vanilla ice cream. (Add it to the ice cream base if you're making the ice cream at home, or stir it into slightly softened store-bought ice cream.)


9 Ways to Cook With Powdered Peanut Butter

I'm a huge peanut butter fan—like an eat-a-jar-with-a-spoon-for-dinner type of fan. So, a few months ago, when I noticed powdered peanut butter on my local health food store shelf, I got curious. I heard people were stirring it into smoothies, mixing it into cookie dough, but I didn't really understand it. Dry peanut butter, what gives?

Being the peanut butter addict that I am, I needed to try it out. So I got a few jars and started experimenting with it in the Epi Test Kitchen, where I discovered that the powder format makes it super easy to add to a variety of different dishes. Here are 9 of the many things you can do with powdered peanut butter:

This one might be obvious, but it's worth mentioning. Mix 4 Tbsp. powdered peanut butter with 1 Tbsp. water and you'll get 2 Tbsp. "peanut butter," or at least a creamy, pseudo-peanut butter. A huge reason people love the stuff is the low-calorie appeal of powdered peanut butter—it's made by removing the natural oils from peanuts and making a powder from what remains—and in those 2 tablespoons of "peanut butter" there are just 90 calories calories and 3 grams of fat, compared to 190 calories and 16 grams of fat in 2 tablespoons of typical, natural creamy peanut butter.

Flavor-wise, not going to lie, the reconstituted version of the powdered stuff wasn't my favorite as straight "peanut butter" it has a sort-of-strange, metallically aftertaste. The true value of the product lies in its ability to meld with other ingredients.

As much as I love PB, I don't normally put peanut butter in my smoothie, because I find the flavor a little overpowering in drink form. But I know fans of the powdered stuff were using it in their smoothies because the powder packs a seriously healthy punch, plus it's smoother than the sometimes gritty real peanut butter. And when I stumbled on this grape and peanut butter smoothie recipe from Food Director Rhoda Boone, I knew it would be a good one. Instead of using the 1 Tbsp. peanut butter, I added in 2 Tbsp. powder, and the drink turned out delicious: slightly sweet, fresh, and full of peanut butter flavor. Like a PB&J, but better.

Peanut Butter and Grape Smoothie

Another easy way to add a spoonful of healthy protein to your breakfast bowl is by stirring it into oatmeal. Top it with fresh blueberries for a similar flavor to that PB&J, and add in plenty of nuts and toasted seeds for good texture.

Baked Oatmeal

You can also sprinkle the powdered stuff into your granola mix for a different take on breakfast. Add it to chocolate granola and you'll have a "puppy chow" flavor going on add it to a coconut, seeded mix for a more tropical version. Serve with Greek yogurt for even more protein.

Paleo Granola with Coconut and Almonds

That chocolate-peanut butter granola? I would totally bring that along on a road trip as a snack. What other snacks can you sprinkle powdered peanut butter on? Try it mixed into trail mix, toasted nuts, or even on caramel popcorn. Movie night just got way better.

Sticky and Sweet Popcorn

Add a boost of flavor and nutrition to your chicken cutlets by mixing a spoonful of powdered peanut butter into the dry mix along with some spicy red chile flakes and garlic powder. A good rule of thumb is to use 1/3 the amount of peanut butter powder as flour in the mixture.

Chicken Cutlets with Romesco and Serrano Cracklin's

Any sauce that calls for peanut butter—think Pad Thai, Asian slaws, or spicy peanut dipping sauces—can also be made with peanut butter powder just rehydrate it first so the sauce isn't too dry. You can also add a spoonful of the powder to a stir-fry to give it a boost of that signature Thai flavor.

Sweet and Spicy Peanut Noodles

For a nutty flavor boost, add peanut butter powder to any baked good—cakes, cookies, pancakes, breads. Since you're not adjusting the amount of fat or moisture in the dish—as you would be if you were swapping out the oil or butter for full-fat peanut butter—it's very easy to add to a recipe. Just sub in peanut butter powder for 1/3 the amount of flour called for in the recipe. For recipes that call for peanut butter already, simply rehydrate the powdered peanut butter and use the same amount.

Peanut Butter Sandwich Cookies, aka "The Nora Ephron"

Peanut butter powder can be used to upgrade desserts in so many ways. Want to frost your chocolate cake with peanut butter icing? Stir peanut butter powder into a simple buttercream frosting recipe. Or try it in chocolate mousse, rice pudding, or even vanilla ice cream. (Add it to the ice cream base if you're making the ice cream at home, or stir it into slightly softened store-bought ice cream.)


9 Ways to Cook With Powdered Peanut Butter

I'm a huge peanut butter fan—like an eat-a-jar-with-a-spoon-for-dinner type of fan. So, a few months ago, when I noticed powdered peanut butter on my local health food store shelf, I got curious. I heard people were stirring it into smoothies, mixing it into cookie dough, but I didn't really understand it. Dry peanut butter, what gives?

Being the peanut butter addict that I am, I needed to try it out. So I got a few jars and started experimenting with it in the Epi Test Kitchen, where I discovered that the powder format makes it super easy to add to a variety of different dishes. Here are 9 of the many things you can do with powdered peanut butter:

This one might be obvious, but it's worth mentioning. Mix 4 Tbsp. powdered peanut butter with 1 Tbsp. water and you'll get 2 Tbsp. "peanut butter," or at least a creamy, pseudo-peanut butter. A huge reason people love the stuff is the low-calorie appeal of powdered peanut butter—it's made by removing the natural oils from peanuts and making a powder from what remains—and in those 2 tablespoons of "peanut butter" there are just 90 calories calories and 3 grams of fat, compared to 190 calories and 16 grams of fat in 2 tablespoons of typical, natural creamy peanut butter.

Flavor-wise, not going to lie, the reconstituted version of the powdered stuff wasn't my favorite as straight "peanut butter" it has a sort-of-strange, metallically aftertaste. The true value of the product lies in its ability to meld with other ingredients.

As much as I love PB, I don't normally put peanut butter in my smoothie, because I find the flavor a little overpowering in drink form. But I know fans of the powdered stuff were using it in their smoothies because the powder packs a seriously healthy punch, plus it's smoother than the sometimes gritty real peanut butter. And when I stumbled on this grape and peanut butter smoothie recipe from Food Director Rhoda Boone, I knew it would be a good one. Instead of using the 1 Tbsp. peanut butter, I added in 2 Tbsp. powder, and the drink turned out delicious: slightly sweet, fresh, and full of peanut butter flavor. Like a PB&J, but better.

Peanut Butter and Grape Smoothie

Another easy way to add a spoonful of healthy protein to your breakfast bowl is by stirring it into oatmeal. Top it with fresh blueberries for a similar flavor to that PB&J, and add in plenty of nuts and toasted seeds for good texture.

Baked Oatmeal

You can also sprinkle the powdered stuff into your granola mix for a different take on breakfast. Add it to chocolate granola and you'll have a "puppy chow" flavor going on add it to a coconut, seeded mix for a more tropical version. Serve with Greek yogurt for even more protein.

Paleo Granola with Coconut and Almonds

That chocolate-peanut butter granola? I would totally bring that along on a road trip as a snack. What other snacks can you sprinkle powdered peanut butter on? Try it mixed into trail mix, toasted nuts, or even on caramel popcorn. Movie night just got way better.

Sticky and Sweet Popcorn

Add a boost of flavor and nutrition to your chicken cutlets by mixing a spoonful of powdered peanut butter into the dry mix along with some spicy red chile flakes and garlic powder. A good rule of thumb is to use 1/3 the amount of peanut butter powder as flour in the mixture.

Chicken Cutlets with Romesco and Serrano Cracklin's

Any sauce that calls for peanut butter—think Pad Thai, Asian slaws, or spicy peanut dipping sauces—can also be made with peanut butter powder just rehydrate it first so the sauce isn't too dry. You can also add a spoonful of the powder to a stir-fry to give it a boost of that signature Thai flavor.

Sweet and Spicy Peanut Noodles

For a nutty flavor boost, add peanut butter powder to any baked good—cakes, cookies, pancakes, breads. Since you're not adjusting the amount of fat or moisture in the dish—as you would be if you were swapping out the oil or butter for full-fat peanut butter—it's very easy to add to a recipe. Just sub in peanut butter powder for 1/3 the amount of flour called for in the recipe. For recipes that call for peanut butter already, simply rehydrate the powdered peanut butter and use the same amount.

Peanut Butter Sandwich Cookies, aka "The Nora Ephron"

Peanut butter powder can be used to upgrade desserts in so many ways. Want to frost your chocolate cake with peanut butter icing? Stir peanut butter powder into a simple buttercream frosting recipe. Or try it in chocolate mousse, rice pudding, or even vanilla ice cream. (Add it to the ice cream base if you're making the ice cream at home, or stir it into slightly softened store-bought ice cream.)


9 Ways to Cook With Powdered Peanut Butter

I'm a huge peanut butter fan—like an eat-a-jar-with-a-spoon-for-dinner type of fan. So, a few months ago, when I noticed powdered peanut butter on my local health food store shelf, I got curious. I heard people were stirring it into smoothies, mixing it into cookie dough, but I didn't really understand it. Dry peanut butter, what gives?

Being the peanut butter addict that I am, I needed to try it out. So I got a few jars and started experimenting with it in the Epi Test Kitchen, where I discovered that the powder format makes it super easy to add to a variety of different dishes. Here are 9 of the many things you can do with powdered peanut butter:

This one might be obvious, but it's worth mentioning. Mix 4 Tbsp. powdered peanut butter with 1 Tbsp. water and you'll get 2 Tbsp. "peanut butter," or at least a creamy, pseudo-peanut butter. A huge reason people love the stuff is the low-calorie appeal of powdered peanut butter—it's made by removing the natural oils from peanuts and making a powder from what remains—and in those 2 tablespoons of "peanut butter" there are just 90 calories calories and 3 grams of fat, compared to 190 calories and 16 grams of fat in 2 tablespoons of typical, natural creamy peanut butter.

Flavor-wise, not going to lie, the reconstituted version of the powdered stuff wasn't my favorite as straight "peanut butter" it has a sort-of-strange, metallically aftertaste. The true value of the product lies in its ability to meld with other ingredients.

As much as I love PB, I don't normally put peanut butter in my smoothie, because I find the flavor a little overpowering in drink form. But I know fans of the powdered stuff were using it in their smoothies because the powder packs a seriously healthy punch, plus it's smoother than the sometimes gritty real peanut butter. And when I stumbled on this grape and peanut butter smoothie recipe from Food Director Rhoda Boone, I knew it would be a good one. Instead of using the 1 Tbsp. peanut butter, I added in 2 Tbsp. powder, and the drink turned out delicious: slightly sweet, fresh, and full of peanut butter flavor. Like a PB&J, but better.

Peanut Butter and Grape Smoothie

Another easy way to add a spoonful of healthy protein to your breakfast bowl is by stirring it into oatmeal. Top it with fresh blueberries for a similar flavor to that PB&J, and add in plenty of nuts and toasted seeds for good texture.

Baked Oatmeal

You can also sprinkle the powdered stuff into your granola mix for a different take on breakfast. Add it to chocolate granola and you'll have a "puppy chow" flavor going on add it to a coconut, seeded mix for a more tropical version. Serve with Greek yogurt for even more protein.

Paleo Granola with Coconut and Almonds

That chocolate-peanut butter granola? I would totally bring that along on a road trip as a snack. What other snacks can you sprinkle powdered peanut butter on? Try it mixed into trail mix, toasted nuts, or even on caramel popcorn. Movie night just got way better.

Sticky and Sweet Popcorn

Add a boost of flavor and nutrition to your chicken cutlets by mixing a spoonful of powdered peanut butter into the dry mix along with some spicy red chile flakes and garlic powder. A good rule of thumb is to use 1/3 the amount of peanut butter powder as flour in the mixture.

Chicken Cutlets with Romesco and Serrano Cracklin's

Any sauce that calls for peanut butter—think Pad Thai, Asian slaws, or spicy peanut dipping sauces—can also be made with peanut butter powder just rehydrate it first so the sauce isn't too dry. You can also add a spoonful of the powder to a stir-fry to give it a boost of that signature Thai flavor.

Sweet and Spicy Peanut Noodles

For a nutty flavor boost, add peanut butter powder to any baked good—cakes, cookies, pancakes, breads. Since you're not adjusting the amount of fat or moisture in the dish—as you would be if you were swapping out the oil or butter for full-fat peanut butter—it's very easy to add to a recipe. Just sub in peanut butter powder for 1/3 the amount of flour called for in the recipe. For recipes that call for peanut butter already, simply rehydrate the powdered peanut butter and use the same amount.

Peanut Butter Sandwich Cookies, aka "The Nora Ephron"

Peanut butter powder can be used to upgrade desserts in so many ways. Want to frost your chocolate cake with peanut butter icing? Stir peanut butter powder into a simple buttercream frosting recipe. Or try it in chocolate mousse, rice pudding, or even vanilla ice cream. (Add it to the ice cream base if you're making the ice cream at home, or stir it into slightly softened store-bought ice cream.)


9 Ways to Cook With Powdered Peanut Butter

I'm a huge peanut butter fan—like an eat-a-jar-with-a-spoon-for-dinner type of fan. So, a few months ago, when I noticed powdered peanut butter on my local health food store shelf, I got curious. I heard people were stirring it into smoothies, mixing it into cookie dough, but I didn't really understand it. Dry peanut butter, what gives?

Being the peanut butter addict that I am, I needed to try it out. So I got a few jars and started experimenting with it in the Epi Test Kitchen, where I discovered that the powder format makes it super easy to add to a variety of different dishes. Here are 9 of the many things you can do with powdered peanut butter:

This one might be obvious, but it's worth mentioning. Mix 4 Tbsp. powdered peanut butter with 1 Tbsp. water and you'll get 2 Tbsp. "peanut butter," or at least a creamy, pseudo-peanut butter. A huge reason people love the stuff is the low-calorie appeal of powdered peanut butter—it's made by removing the natural oils from peanuts and making a powder from what remains—and in those 2 tablespoons of "peanut butter" there are just 90 calories calories and 3 grams of fat, compared to 190 calories and 16 grams of fat in 2 tablespoons of typical, natural creamy peanut butter.

Flavor-wise, not going to lie, the reconstituted version of the powdered stuff wasn't my favorite as straight "peanut butter" it has a sort-of-strange, metallically aftertaste. The true value of the product lies in its ability to meld with other ingredients.

As much as I love PB, I don't normally put peanut butter in my smoothie, because I find the flavor a little overpowering in drink form. But I know fans of the powdered stuff were using it in their smoothies because the powder packs a seriously healthy punch, plus it's smoother than the sometimes gritty real peanut butter. And when I stumbled on this grape and peanut butter smoothie recipe from Food Director Rhoda Boone, I knew it would be a good one. Instead of using the 1 Tbsp. peanut butter, I added in 2 Tbsp. powder, and the drink turned out delicious: slightly sweet, fresh, and full of peanut butter flavor. Like a PB&J, but better.

Peanut Butter and Grape Smoothie

Another easy way to add a spoonful of healthy protein to your breakfast bowl is by stirring it into oatmeal. Top it with fresh blueberries for a similar flavor to that PB&J, and add in plenty of nuts and toasted seeds for good texture.

Baked Oatmeal

You can also sprinkle the powdered stuff into your granola mix for a different take on breakfast. Add it to chocolate granola and you'll have a "puppy chow" flavor going on add it to a coconut, seeded mix for a more tropical version. Serve with Greek yogurt for even more protein.

Paleo Granola with Coconut and Almonds

That chocolate-peanut butter granola? I would totally bring that along on a road trip as a snack. What other snacks can you sprinkle powdered peanut butter on? Try it mixed into trail mix, toasted nuts, or even on caramel popcorn. Movie night just got way better.

Sticky and Sweet Popcorn

Add a boost of flavor and nutrition to your chicken cutlets by mixing a spoonful of powdered peanut butter into the dry mix along with some spicy red chile flakes and garlic powder. A good rule of thumb is to use 1/3 the amount of peanut butter powder as flour in the mixture.

Chicken Cutlets with Romesco and Serrano Cracklin's

Any sauce that calls for peanut butter—think Pad Thai, Asian slaws, or spicy peanut dipping sauces—can also be made with peanut butter powder just rehydrate it first so the sauce isn't too dry. You can also add a spoonful of the powder to a stir-fry to give it a boost of that signature Thai flavor.

Sweet and Spicy Peanut Noodles

For a nutty flavor boost, add peanut butter powder to any baked good—cakes, cookies, pancakes, breads. Since you're not adjusting the amount of fat or moisture in the dish—as you would be if you were swapping out the oil or butter for full-fat peanut butter—it's very easy to add to a recipe. Just sub in peanut butter powder for 1/3 the amount of flour called for in the recipe. For recipes that call for peanut butter already, simply rehydrate the powdered peanut butter and use the same amount.

Peanut Butter Sandwich Cookies, aka "The Nora Ephron"

Peanut butter powder can be used to upgrade desserts in so many ways. Want to frost your chocolate cake with peanut butter icing? Stir peanut butter powder into a simple buttercream frosting recipe. Or try it in chocolate mousse, rice pudding, or even vanilla ice cream. (Add it to the ice cream base if you're making the ice cream at home, or stir it into slightly softened store-bought ice cream.)


9 Ways to Cook With Powdered Peanut Butter

I'm a huge peanut butter fan—like an eat-a-jar-with-a-spoon-for-dinner type of fan. So, a few months ago, when I noticed powdered peanut butter on my local health food store shelf, I got curious. I heard people were stirring it into smoothies, mixing it into cookie dough, but I didn't really understand it. Dry peanut butter, what gives?

Being the peanut butter addict that I am, I needed to try it out. So I got a few jars and started experimenting with it in the Epi Test Kitchen, where I discovered that the powder format makes it super easy to add to a variety of different dishes. Here are 9 of the many things you can do with powdered peanut butter:

This one might be obvious, but it's worth mentioning. Mix 4 Tbsp. powdered peanut butter with 1 Tbsp. water and you'll get 2 Tbsp. "peanut butter," or at least a creamy, pseudo-peanut butter. A huge reason people love the stuff is the low-calorie appeal of powdered peanut butter—it's made by removing the natural oils from peanuts and making a powder from what remains—and in those 2 tablespoons of "peanut butter" there are just 90 calories calories and 3 grams of fat, compared to 190 calories and 16 grams of fat in 2 tablespoons of typical, natural creamy peanut butter.

Flavor-wise, not going to lie, the reconstituted version of the powdered stuff wasn't my favorite as straight "peanut butter" it has a sort-of-strange, metallically aftertaste. The true value of the product lies in its ability to meld with other ingredients.

As much as I love PB, I don't normally put peanut butter in my smoothie, because I find the flavor a little overpowering in drink form. But I know fans of the powdered stuff were using it in their smoothies because the powder packs a seriously healthy punch, plus it's smoother than the sometimes gritty real peanut butter. And when I stumbled on this grape and peanut butter smoothie recipe from Food Director Rhoda Boone, I knew it would be a good one. Instead of using the 1 Tbsp. peanut butter, I added in 2 Tbsp. powder, and the drink turned out delicious: slightly sweet, fresh, and full of peanut butter flavor. Like a PB&J, but better.

Peanut Butter and Grape Smoothie

Another easy way to add a spoonful of healthy protein to your breakfast bowl is by stirring it into oatmeal. Top it with fresh blueberries for a similar flavor to that PB&J, and add in plenty of nuts and toasted seeds for good texture.

Baked Oatmeal

You can also sprinkle the powdered stuff into your granola mix for a different take on breakfast. Add it to chocolate granola and you'll have a "puppy chow" flavor going on add it to a coconut, seeded mix for a more tropical version. Serve with Greek yogurt for even more protein.

Paleo Granola with Coconut and Almonds

That chocolate-peanut butter granola? I would totally bring that along on a road trip as a snack. What other snacks can you sprinkle powdered peanut butter on? Try it mixed into trail mix, toasted nuts, or even on caramel popcorn. Movie night just got way better.

Sticky and Sweet Popcorn

Add a boost of flavor and nutrition to your chicken cutlets by mixing a spoonful of powdered peanut butter into the dry mix along with some spicy red chile flakes and garlic powder. A good rule of thumb is to use 1/3 the amount of peanut butter powder as flour in the mixture.

Chicken Cutlets with Romesco and Serrano Cracklin's

Any sauce that calls for peanut butter—think Pad Thai, Asian slaws, or spicy peanut dipping sauces—can also be made with peanut butter powder just rehydrate it first so the sauce isn't too dry. You can also add a spoonful of the powder to a stir-fry to give it a boost of that signature Thai flavor.

Sweet and Spicy Peanut Noodles

For a nutty flavor boost, add peanut butter powder to any baked good—cakes, cookies, pancakes, breads. Since you're not adjusting the amount of fat or moisture in the dish—as you would be if you were swapping out the oil or butter for full-fat peanut butter—it's very easy to add to a recipe. Just sub in peanut butter powder for 1/3 the amount of flour called for in the recipe. For recipes that call for peanut butter already, simply rehydrate the powdered peanut butter and use the same amount.

Peanut Butter Sandwich Cookies, aka "The Nora Ephron"

Peanut butter powder can be used to upgrade desserts in so many ways. Want to frost your chocolate cake with peanut butter icing? Stir peanut butter powder into a simple buttercream frosting recipe. Or try it in chocolate mousse, rice pudding, or even vanilla ice cream. (Add it to the ice cream base if you're making the ice cream at home, or stir it into slightly softened store-bought ice cream.)


9 Ways to Cook With Powdered Peanut Butter

I'm a huge peanut butter fan—like an eat-a-jar-with-a-spoon-for-dinner type of fan. So, a few months ago, when I noticed powdered peanut butter on my local health food store shelf, I got curious. I heard people were stirring it into smoothies, mixing it into cookie dough, but I didn't really understand it. Dry peanut butter, what gives?

Being the peanut butter addict that I am, I needed to try it out. So I got a few jars and started experimenting with it in the Epi Test Kitchen, where I discovered that the powder format makes it super easy to add to a variety of different dishes. Here are 9 of the many things you can do with powdered peanut butter:

This one might be obvious, but it's worth mentioning. Mix 4 Tbsp. powdered peanut butter with 1 Tbsp. water and you'll get 2 Tbsp. "peanut butter," or at least a creamy, pseudo-peanut butter. A huge reason people love the stuff is the low-calorie appeal of powdered peanut butter—it's made by removing the natural oils from peanuts and making a powder from what remains—and in those 2 tablespoons of "peanut butter" there are just 90 calories calories and 3 grams of fat, compared to 190 calories and 16 grams of fat in 2 tablespoons of typical, natural creamy peanut butter.

Flavor-wise, not going to lie, the reconstituted version of the powdered stuff wasn't my favorite as straight "peanut butter" it has a sort-of-strange, metallically aftertaste. The true value of the product lies in its ability to meld with other ingredients.

As much as I love PB, I don't normally put peanut butter in my smoothie, because I find the flavor a little overpowering in drink form. But I know fans of the powdered stuff were using it in their smoothies because the powder packs a seriously healthy punch, plus it's smoother than the sometimes gritty real peanut butter. And when I stumbled on this grape and peanut butter smoothie recipe from Food Director Rhoda Boone, I knew it would be a good one. Instead of using the 1 Tbsp. peanut butter, I added in 2 Tbsp. powder, and the drink turned out delicious: slightly sweet, fresh, and full of peanut butter flavor. Like a PB&J, but better.

Peanut Butter and Grape Smoothie

Another easy way to add a spoonful of healthy protein to your breakfast bowl is by stirring it into oatmeal. Top it with fresh blueberries for a similar flavor to that PB&J, and add in plenty of nuts and toasted seeds for good texture.

Baked Oatmeal

You can also sprinkle the powdered stuff into your granola mix for a different take on breakfast. Add it to chocolate granola and you'll have a "puppy chow" flavor going on add it to a coconut, seeded mix for a more tropical version. Serve with Greek yogurt for even more protein.

Paleo Granola with Coconut and Almonds

That chocolate-peanut butter granola? I would totally bring that along on a road trip as a snack. What other snacks can you sprinkle powdered peanut butter on? Try it mixed into trail mix, toasted nuts, or even on caramel popcorn. Movie night just got way better.

Sticky and Sweet Popcorn

Add a boost of flavor and nutrition to your chicken cutlets by mixing a spoonful of powdered peanut butter into the dry mix along with some spicy red chile flakes and garlic powder. A good rule of thumb is to use 1/3 the amount of peanut butter powder as flour in the mixture.

Chicken Cutlets with Romesco and Serrano Cracklin's

Any sauce that calls for peanut butter—think Pad Thai, Asian slaws, or spicy peanut dipping sauces—can also be made with peanut butter powder just rehydrate it first so the sauce isn't too dry. You can also add a spoonful of the powder to a stir-fry to give it a boost of that signature Thai flavor.

Sweet and Spicy Peanut Noodles

For a nutty flavor boost, add peanut butter powder to any baked good—cakes, cookies, pancakes, breads. Since you're not adjusting the amount of fat or moisture in the dish—as you would be if you were swapping out the oil or butter for full-fat peanut butter—it's very easy to add to a recipe. Just sub in peanut butter powder for 1/3 the amount of flour called for in the recipe. For recipes that call for peanut butter already, simply rehydrate the powdered peanut butter and use the same amount.

Peanut Butter Sandwich Cookies, aka "The Nora Ephron"

Peanut butter powder can be used to upgrade desserts in so many ways. Want to frost your chocolate cake with peanut butter icing? Stir peanut butter powder into a simple buttercream frosting recipe. Or try it in chocolate mousse, rice pudding, or even vanilla ice cream. (Add it to the ice cream base if you're making the ice cream at home, or stir it into slightly softened store-bought ice cream.)


9 Ways to Cook With Powdered Peanut Butter

I'm a huge peanut butter fan—like an eat-a-jar-with-a-spoon-for-dinner type of fan. So, a few months ago, when I noticed powdered peanut butter on my local health food store shelf, I got curious. I heard people were stirring it into smoothies, mixing it into cookie dough, but I didn't really understand it. Dry peanut butter, what gives?

Being the peanut butter addict that I am, I needed to try it out. So I got a few jars and started experimenting with it in the Epi Test Kitchen, where I discovered that the powder format makes it super easy to add to a variety of different dishes. Here are 9 of the many things you can do with powdered peanut butter:

This one might be obvious, but it's worth mentioning. Mix 4 Tbsp. powdered peanut butter with 1 Tbsp. water and you'll get 2 Tbsp. "peanut butter," or at least a creamy, pseudo-peanut butter. A huge reason people love the stuff is the low-calorie appeal of powdered peanut butter—it's made by removing the natural oils from peanuts and making a powder from what remains—and in those 2 tablespoons of "peanut butter" there are just 90 calories calories and 3 grams of fat, compared to 190 calories and 16 grams of fat in 2 tablespoons of typical, natural creamy peanut butter.

Flavor-wise, not going to lie, the reconstituted version of the powdered stuff wasn't my favorite as straight "peanut butter" it has a sort-of-strange, metallically aftertaste. The true value of the product lies in its ability to meld with other ingredients.

As much as I love PB, I don't normally put peanut butter in my smoothie, because I find the flavor a little overpowering in drink form. But I know fans of the powdered stuff were using it in their smoothies because the powder packs a seriously healthy punch, plus it's smoother than the sometimes gritty real peanut butter. And when I stumbled on this grape and peanut butter smoothie recipe from Food Director Rhoda Boone, I knew it would be a good one. Instead of using the 1 Tbsp. peanut butter, I added in 2 Tbsp. powder, and the drink turned out delicious: slightly sweet, fresh, and full of peanut butter flavor. Like a PB&J, but better.

Peanut Butter and Grape Smoothie

Another easy way to add a spoonful of healthy protein to your breakfast bowl is by stirring it into oatmeal. Top it with fresh blueberries for a similar flavor to that PB&J, and add in plenty of nuts and toasted seeds for good texture.

Baked Oatmeal

You can also sprinkle the powdered stuff into your granola mix for a different take on breakfast. Add it to chocolate granola and you'll have a "puppy chow" flavor going on add it to a coconut, seeded mix for a more tropical version. Serve with Greek yogurt for even more protein.

Paleo Granola with Coconut and Almonds

That chocolate-peanut butter granola? I would totally bring that along on a road trip as a snack. What other snacks can you sprinkle powdered peanut butter on? Try it mixed into trail mix, toasted nuts, or even on caramel popcorn. Movie night just got way better.

Sticky and Sweet Popcorn

Add a boost of flavor and nutrition to your chicken cutlets by mixing a spoonful of powdered peanut butter into the dry mix along with some spicy red chile flakes and garlic powder. A good rule of thumb is to use 1/3 the amount of peanut butter powder as flour in the mixture.

Chicken Cutlets with Romesco and Serrano Cracklin's

Any sauce that calls for peanut butter—think Pad Thai, Asian slaws, or spicy peanut dipping sauces—can also be made with peanut butter powder just rehydrate it first so the sauce isn't too dry. You can also add a spoonful of the powder to a stir-fry to give it a boost of that signature Thai flavor.

Sweet and Spicy Peanut Noodles

For a nutty flavor boost, add peanut butter powder to any baked good—cakes, cookies, pancakes, breads. Since you're not adjusting the amount of fat or moisture in the dish—as you would be if you were swapping out the oil or butter for full-fat peanut butter—it's very easy to add to a recipe. Just sub in peanut butter powder for 1/3 the amount of flour called for in the recipe. For recipes that call for peanut butter already, simply rehydrate the powdered peanut butter and use the same amount.

Peanut Butter Sandwich Cookies, aka "The Nora Ephron"

Peanut butter powder can be used to upgrade desserts in so many ways. Want to frost your chocolate cake with peanut butter icing? Stir peanut butter powder into a simple buttercream frosting recipe. Or try it in chocolate mousse, rice pudding, or even vanilla ice cream. (Add it to the ice cream base if you're making the ice cream at home, or stir it into slightly softened store-bought ice cream.)


9 Ways to Cook With Powdered Peanut Butter

I'm a huge peanut butter fan—like an eat-a-jar-with-a-spoon-for-dinner type of fan. So, a few months ago, when I noticed powdered peanut butter on my local health food store shelf, I got curious. I heard people were stirring it into smoothies, mixing it into cookie dough, but I didn't really understand it. Dry peanut butter, what gives?

Being the peanut butter addict that I am, I needed to try it out. So I got a few jars and started experimenting with it in the Epi Test Kitchen, where I discovered that the powder format makes it super easy to add to a variety of different dishes. Here are 9 of the many things you can do with powdered peanut butter:

This one might be obvious, but it's worth mentioning. Mix 4 Tbsp. powdered peanut butter with 1 Tbsp. water and you'll get 2 Tbsp. "peanut butter," or at least a creamy, pseudo-peanut butter. A huge reason people love the stuff is the low-calorie appeal of powdered peanut butter—it's made by removing the natural oils from peanuts and making a powder from what remains—and in those 2 tablespoons of "peanut butter" there are just 90 calories calories and 3 grams of fat, compared to 190 calories and 16 grams of fat in 2 tablespoons of typical, natural creamy peanut butter.

Flavor-wise, not going to lie, the reconstituted version of the powdered stuff wasn't my favorite as straight "peanut butter" it has a sort-of-strange, metallically aftertaste. The true value of the product lies in its ability to meld with other ingredients.

As much as I love PB, I don't normally put peanut butter in my smoothie, because I find the flavor a little overpowering in drink form. But I know fans of the powdered stuff were using it in their smoothies because the powder packs a seriously healthy punch, plus it's smoother than the sometimes gritty real peanut butter. And when I stumbled on this grape and peanut butter smoothie recipe from Food Director Rhoda Boone, I knew it would be a good one. Instead of using the 1 Tbsp. peanut butter, I added in 2 Tbsp. powder, and the drink turned out delicious: slightly sweet, fresh, and full of peanut butter flavor. Like a PB&J, but better.

Peanut Butter and Grape Smoothie

Another easy way to add a spoonful of healthy protein to your breakfast bowl is by stirring it into oatmeal. Top it with fresh blueberries for a similar flavor to that PB&J, and add in plenty of nuts and toasted seeds for good texture.

Baked Oatmeal

You can also sprinkle the powdered stuff into your granola mix for a different take on breakfast. Add it to chocolate granola and you'll have a "puppy chow" flavor going on add it to a coconut, seeded mix for a more tropical version. Serve with Greek yogurt for even more protein.

Paleo Granola with Coconut and Almonds

That chocolate-peanut butter granola? I would totally bring that along on a road trip as a snack. What other snacks can you sprinkle powdered peanut butter on? Try it mixed into trail mix, toasted nuts, or even on caramel popcorn. Movie night just got way better.

Sticky and Sweet Popcorn

Add a boost of flavor and nutrition to your chicken cutlets by mixing a spoonful of powdered peanut butter into the dry mix along with some spicy red chile flakes and garlic powder. A good rule of thumb is to use 1/3 the amount of peanut butter powder as flour in the mixture.

Chicken Cutlets with Romesco and Serrano Cracklin's

Any sauce that calls for peanut butter—think Pad Thai, Asian slaws, or spicy peanut dipping sauces—can also be made with peanut butter powder just rehydrate it first so the sauce isn't too dry. You can also add a spoonful of the powder to a stir-fry to give it a boost of that signature Thai flavor.

Sweet and Spicy Peanut Noodles

For a nutty flavor boost, add peanut butter powder to any baked good—cakes, cookies, pancakes, breads. Since you're not adjusting the amount of fat or moisture in the dish—as you would be if you were swapping out the oil or butter for full-fat peanut butter—it's very easy to add to a recipe. Just sub in peanut butter powder for 1/3 the amount of flour called for in the recipe. For recipes that call for peanut butter already, simply rehydrate the powdered peanut butter and use the same amount.

Peanut Butter Sandwich Cookies, aka "The Nora Ephron"

Peanut butter powder can be used to upgrade desserts in so many ways. Want to frost your chocolate cake with peanut butter icing? Stir peanut butter powder into a simple buttercream frosting recipe. Or try it in chocolate mousse, rice pudding, or even vanilla ice cream. (Add it to the ice cream base if you're making the ice cream at home, or stir it into slightly softened store-bought ice cream.)


9 Ways to Cook With Powdered Peanut Butter

I'm a huge peanut butter fan—like an eat-a-jar-with-a-spoon-for-dinner type of fan. So, a few months ago, when I noticed powdered peanut butter on my local health food store shelf, I got curious. I heard people were stirring it into smoothies, mixing it into cookie dough, but I didn't really understand it. Dry peanut butter, what gives?

Being the peanut butter addict that I am, I needed to try it out. So I got a few jars and started experimenting with it in the Epi Test Kitchen, where I discovered that the powder format makes it super easy to add to a variety of different dishes. Here are 9 of the many things you can do with powdered peanut butter:

This one might be obvious, but it's worth mentioning. Mix 4 Tbsp. powdered peanut butter with 1 Tbsp. water and you'll get 2 Tbsp. "peanut butter," or at least a creamy, pseudo-peanut butter. A huge reason people love the stuff is the low-calorie appeal of powdered peanut butter—it's made by removing the natural oils from peanuts and making a powder from what remains—and in those 2 tablespoons of "peanut butter" there are just 90 calories calories and 3 grams of fat, compared to 190 calories and 16 grams of fat in 2 tablespoons of typical, natural creamy peanut butter.

Flavor-wise, not going to lie, the reconstituted version of the powdered stuff wasn't my favorite as straight "peanut butter" it has a sort-of-strange, metallically aftertaste. The true value of the product lies in its ability to meld with other ingredients.

As much as I love PB, I don't normally put peanut butter in my smoothie, because I find the flavor a little overpowering in drink form. But I know fans of the powdered stuff were using it in their smoothies because the powder packs a seriously healthy punch, plus it's smoother than the sometimes gritty real peanut butter. And when I stumbled on this grape and peanut butter smoothie recipe from Food Director Rhoda Boone, I knew it would be a good one. Instead of using the 1 Tbsp. peanut butter, I added in 2 Tbsp. powder, and the drink turned out delicious: slightly sweet, fresh, and full of peanut butter flavor. Like a PB&J, but better.

Peanut Butter and Grape Smoothie

Another easy way to add a spoonful of healthy protein to your breakfast bowl is by stirring it into oatmeal. Top it with fresh blueberries for a similar flavor to that PB&J, and add in plenty of nuts and toasted seeds for good texture.

Baked Oatmeal

You can also sprinkle the powdered stuff into your granola mix for a different take on breakfast. Add it to chocolate granola and you'll have a "puppy chow" flavor going on add it to a coconut, seeded mix for a more tropical version. Serve with Greek yogurt for even more protein.

Paleo Granola with Coconut and Almonds

That chocolate-peanut butter granola? I would totally bring that along on a road trip as a snack. What other snacks can you sprinkle powdered peanut butter on? Try it mixed into trail mix, toasted nuts, or even on caramel popcorn. Movie night just got way better.

Sticky and Sweet Popcorn

Add a boost of flavor and nutrition to your chicken cutlets by mixing a spoonful of powdered peanut butter into the dry mix along with some spicy red chile flakes and garlic powder. A good rule of thumb is to use 1/3 the amount of peanut butter powder as flour in the mixture.

Chicken Cutlets with Romesco and Serrano Cracklin's

Any sauce that calls for peanut butter—think Pad Thai, Asian slaws, or spicy peanut dipping sauces—can also be made with peanut butter powder just rehydrate it first so the sauce isn't too dry. You can also add a spoonful of the powder to a stir-fry to give it a boost of that signature Thai flavor.

Sweet and Spicy Peanut Noodles

For a nutty flavor boost, add peanut butter powder to any baked good—cakes, cookies, pancakes, breads. Since you're not adjusting the amount of fat or moisture in the dish—as you would be if you were swapping out the oil or butter for full-fat peanut butter—it's very easy to add to a recipe. Just sub in peanut butter powder for 1/3 the amount of flour called for in the recipe. For recipes that call for peanut butter already, simply rehydrate the powdered peanut butter and use the same amount.

Peanut Butter Sandwich Cookies, aka "The Nora Ephron"

Peanut butter powder can be used to upgrade desserts in so many ways. Want to frost your chocolate cake with peanut butter icing? Stir peanut butter powder into a simple buttercream frosting recipe. Or try it in chocolate mousse, rice pudding, or even vanilla ice cream. (Add it to the ice cream base if you're making the ice cream at home, or stir it into slightly softened store-bought ice cream.)